Witness Walls: Interdisciplinary Unit

To commemorate Nashville's role in the historic Civil Rights Movement, the Metro Arts Commission approved the selection of artist Walter Hood to create new public art. The Metro Arts Teacher Cadre worked together to create six standards-aligned lessons that focus on the Witness Walls artwork planned for installation in downtown Nashville in 2015. The lesson plans are shared to benefit Nashville-area teachers and others throughout Tennessee and the surrounding region. The design for Witness Walls utilizes iconic photos of the Civil Rights movement in Nashville to honor the events and the people who created the blueprint for nonviolent protest.  The installation will be located on the west side of the historic Metro Nashville Courthouse, steps away from the historic April 19, 1960 student-led protest.

Standards & Objectives

Academic standards
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text,...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.3
Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.1
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.3
Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.1
Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.3
Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.1
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.3
Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3
Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.3
Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.7
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7
Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.7
Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.7
Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.7
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or...
 
Alignment of this item to academic standards is based on recommendations from content creators, resource curators, and visitors to this website. It is the responsibility of each educator to verify that the materials are appropriate for your content area, aligned to current academic standards, and will be beneficial to your specific students.
 
Learning objectives: 

CLE 3231.4.3 Explore the optics of lenses

CLE 3231.4.4 Analyze the optics of mirrors

SPI.3231.4.5 Identify the properties of light related to reflection, refraction, diffraction, and interference of light waves

SPI.3231.4.6 Using light ray diagrams, identify the path of light using a convex lens, a concave lens, a plane mirror, a concave mirror and a convex mirror.

State Performance Indicators:

SPI.3231.4.5 Identify the properties of light related to reflection, refraction, diffraction, and interference of light waves

SPI.3231.4.6 Using light ray diagrams, identify the path of light using a convex lens, a concave lens, a plane mirror, a concave mirror and a convex mirror.

Unit Components

Unit Variations

Blooms taxonomy level: 
Applying
Differentiation suggestions: 

The websites in the interactive reading sections can be adjusted to different websites on students reading levels or the questions from the reading can be adjusted.

The product can be adjusted to meet the students’ needs.  The product can be less open-ended and provide guided questions for students who need the scaffolding.

Extension suggestions: 

Extension suggestions: 

  • Students can create a witness wall on the Civil Rights Movement for the entire south.  Students may create witness walls to highlight other parts of history as well.
  • To adapt the lesson, making it more rigorous for grades 9-12, students may conduct research using multiple sources on their assigned Civil Rights participant.
  • To extend the learning, students could make their own witness wall for the school. It would be built on the same principles from the artist. The witness wall would have to include at least one concave, convex, and plane mirror.

Helpful Hints

Nashville Civil Rights Movement:

  • Teacher should place students in groups strategically based on level.  
  • Each group should contain a designated peer leader, middle level learners, and lower level learners OR lower level learners should be placed together to allow direct instruction with the teacher while other groups have a designated peer leader whose job is to lead the group and report to the teacher with any questions or help.
  • Students will be given a rubric to follow, including specific questions to answer when exploring their designated Civil Rights activist.

Optical Illusions:

  • Required materials: Spoon, water, mirrors, glass test tube, stopper, ruler, index card, Witness Wall picture, Explore Learning account, computer access, flashlight, modeling clay, protractor, construction paper, flashlight.

 

References

Contributors: