Fact and Opinion in Advertising

This lesson challenges students to create a set of tips that could help consumers to make this distinction. Being able to tell the difference between factual claims and opinions can help consumers to make smart choices and avoid market disappointments. While it focuses primarily on fact-opinion, this lesson would work as an introduction or springboard to propaganda techniques and persuasive devices in advertising.

Standards & Objectives

Academic standards
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.1
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.8
Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.9
Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.1
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.7
Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text,...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.9
Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches...
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.3
Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
GLE 0601.5.2
Analyze text for fact-opinion, cause-effect, inferences, evidence, and conclusions.
GLE 0601.8.3
Recognize the conventions of various literary genres.
SPI 0601.5.7
Make inferences and draw conclusions based on evidence in text.
TSS.ELA.6.RI.IKI.8
Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
TSS.ELA.6.RI.IKI.9
Compare and contrast two or more authors' presentation of the same topic or event.
TSS.ELA.6.RI.KID.1
Analyze what a text says explicitly and draw logical inferences; cite textual evidence to support conclusions.
TSS.ELA.6.RL.IKI.9
Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.
TSS.ELA.6.RL.KID.1
Analyze what a text says explicitly and draw logical inferences; cite textual evidence to support conclusions.
TSS.ELA.6.SL.CC.3
Explain a speaker's argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
TSS.ELA.6.W.RBPK.9
Support interpretations, analyses, reflections, or research with evidence found in literature or informational texts, applying grade 6 standards for reading.
 
Alignment of this item to academic standards is based on recommendations from content creators, resource curators, and visitors to this website. It is the responsibility of each educator to verify that the materials are appropriate for your content area, aligned to current academic standards, and will be beneficial to your specific students.
 
Learning objectives: 

Students Will:

  • Explain the role of advertising from the seller’s point of view.
  • Distinguish between fact and opinion in advertisements.
  • View advertisements with a healthy skepticism.

Lesson Variations

Blooms taxonomy level: 
Understanding
Extension suggestions: 

Extension Activity:

  • Locate an ad in a magazine and read each sentence. If the sentence states a fact, put an F beside it. If the sentence states an opinion, put an O beside it.
  • Visit Food Advertising Trick s to find out how food stylists make burgers, chicken and ice cream look so great in ads. The interactive activity is part of Don’t Buy It: Be Media Smart Web site created by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
  • Watch for advertisements that seem to promise more than they can deliver. If you prefer, pre-record a few ads with questionable claims and images. For younger students, ads promoting action figures, racing cars and dolls are among those most likely to include questionable claims. Older students will probably be more interested in promotions for clothing, cars, music, etc.

References

Contributors: